• How cancer’s relationship with culture influences whether women seek treatment or not
    Recent news from the UK about British Asian women choosing to forgo treatment for cancer – due to culturally-steeped stigmas – has stirred up a conversation about how cancer relates to culture.
  • “Drop Out Club”: Explore the alternatives – Part Two
    Drop Out Club (DOC) has offered over 37,000 healthcare professionals from numerous countries a solution after having left their conventional careers. A representative from the organisation itself, Heather Clisby, shares a little about DOC’s background and what’s in the pipeline for the organisation with MIMS in this exclusive two-part interview.
  • Malaysia updates guideline: Primary and Secondary Prevention of CVD 2017
    Recently, the National Heart Association of Malaysia published an updated clinical practice guideline on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in order to encompass modern developments and an increase in information about the potential causation of CVD.
  • The unexpected result of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria: A rise in antibiotic prescription
    Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDTs) have been effectively used to distinguish between malarial and non-malarial fevers – to ensure appropriate and timely medical treatments could be given. However, a study showed an unintended consequence of this – an overuse of antibiotics.
  • Boosting anti-TB campaign in Cam Norte through advocating for proper treatment

    Local government units in Camarines Norte, in cooperation with the Department of Health, have formed task forces comprised of barangay (village) health workers to implement anti-tuberculosis measures.


  • Wire from braces found in woman’s abdomen after 10 years
    In an emergency operation, doctors who had expected to remove a fish bone found an orthodontic wire that had resided in the intestine of an Australian woman for more than a decade.
  • Colleges, universities encouraged to adopt drug testing policy for students

    Colleges and universities can now choose to adopt a mandatory drug testing policy starting school year 2018-2019.


  • Uses of light therapy in medicine
    The development of light therapy has led to a variety of applications today—both for home use and at a clinical setting. While light therapy is considerably safe, precautions must still be taken—especially for certain groups of patients.
  • Sleep disorders in pregnant mothers linked to premature births
    A study that pored over 3 million birth data in California has revealed an interesting correlation between sleep disorders and premature births. Conclusively, mothers who had less than 40 winks would most likely give birth to babies at less than 40 weeks of gestation.
  • Labour group wants wearing of high heels at work regulated

    For safety and health concerns, a labour union group has asked the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) to consider drafting a policy that would ban companies from requiring women to wear high heels nationwide. especially for workers who have to be on their feet most of the day.


  • News Bites: US FDA approves first drug to treat all forms of hepatitis C, Immunotherapy could slow the advance of type 1 diabetes
    This week, British researchers have suggested that an existing diabetes drug can slow the progress of Parkinson’s disease. An international collaborative study proved that gold could increase the effectiveness of drugs used to treat lung cancer cells. Also, a liquid biopsy that was designed to identify cancer cells from a blood sample, could also detect abnormalities in foetal DNA, according to researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles.
  • Kampung Admiralty: First active ageing hub integrating senior and junior Singaporeans
    Singapore’s first-ever “retirement kampung” integrating a childcare centre and eldercare facilities will fully open this September. The concept – first of 10 similar projects by HDB – provides a conducive living environment for the ageing population.
  • “Drop Out Club”: Explore the alternatives – Part One
    Drop Out Club (DOC) has offered over 37,000 healthcare professionals from numerous countries a solution after having left their conventional careers. A representative from the organisation itself, Heather Clisby, shares a little about DOC’s background and what’s in the pipeline for the organisation with MIMS in this exclusive two-part interview.