Ramadan is a Holy month in the Islamic calendar, a time when Muslims around the world fast between 28-30 days from dawn to dusk.

With the need for changes in the patient’s diet and medication regimes, healthcare providers should provide appropriate advice to their patients during this month.

Glycaemic targets during Ramadan

During Ramadan, glycaemic targets will depend on comorbid conditions and on whether the patient has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Glucose control is relaxed to avoid hypoglycaemia. For patients who conduct self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), premeal glucose levels should be 5 to 6 mmol/L while 2 hours after meals, glucose levels should be about 6 to 9 mmol/L. However, patients have to revert to tight glucose control after Ramadan, said Dr Hajah Masni Mohamad, Consultant Endocrinologist of Hospital Putrajaya.



Adjustments for Oral Hypoglycaemic Agents (OHA) in patients with Type 2 diabetes during Ramadan

Oral Hypoglycaemic Agents
Practical Guide to Diabetes Management in Ramadan (2015)
Practical Guide to Diabetes Management in Ramadan (2015)

Insulin as adjustments during Ramadan

Practical Guide to Diabetes Management in Ramadan (2015)
Practical Guide to Diabetes Management in Ramadan (2015)

For a more comprehensive guideline please visit:
Diabetes and Ramadan:Practical Guidelines (International Diabetes Federation (IDF), in collaboration with the Diabetes and Ramadan (DAR) International Alliance) MIMS

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Read more:
A close look at fasting and diabetes
Can fasting enhance the quality of health?
6 health benefits of Ramadan fasting

Sources:
http://www.mems.my/file_dir/6141848835587797f8a01e.pdf
https://www.worlddiabetesfoundation.org/sites/default/files/IDF%20%26%20DAR%20Guidelines%20April-16-low_0.pdf