• Pharmacist found to have destroyed $1.5m worth of cancer drugs
    An Israeli pharmacist has destroyed massive amounts of cancer drug. His motivation behind such an act? Not getting his promotion.
  • Plastic surgeries: From restoration to augmentation
    A boom in society becoming increasingly concerned about their looks has, for doctors, presented an opportunity like never before for the inclusion of plastic surgery in their work, where it was once modestly hidden from the limelight that held medical procedures. However, research has also demonstrated that patients have a startling lack of awareness concerning the risks of plastic surgery. As medical professionals, this should be a cause for concern.
  • Should healthcare professional accept gifts from their patients?
    It is natural for patients to gift their physicians as an expression of their gratitude, but not all gifts to doctors bear innocent intentions. Physicians need to know when to turn down gifts that can potentially jeopardise the patient-doctor relationship.
  • Plans for 7,000 nursing cuts despite the UK’s growing nurse shortage
    A 9.4% vacancy rate and increasingly demanding industry mean nurses are stretched to breaking point.
  • Trump's vague healthcare decisions on the eve of his inauguration
    Donald Trump will be installed into the White House on 20 January. While he has assured Americans that his new healthcare plan would be much more affordable and cover all citizens, the vagueness of his plans raises much doubt. Will there be a favourable solution?
  • Two patient deaths as a result of pharmacists’ errors
    When medications are the patient’s lifeline, pharmacists are facing increasing pressure to deliver competent service. In separate incidences, two pharmacists in Canada made tragic medication errors that led to fatalities.
  • How bad is the counterfeit drug problem in Malaysia?
    Unfortunately, the issue of availability of counterfeit drugs is widespread within the Asia Pacific region, including Malaysia. To combat such an issue, the relevant stakeholders including pharmacists should have at least a basic understanding of the situation.
  • The need to develop a culture of research in nursing
    In recent times, the ageing of populations has become a forefront concern in many countries. Likewise, Malaysia is also experiencing an increase in the elderly population, as a result of the increase in life expectancy, low mortality and decline in fertility. Demographic projections have placed Malaysia as the fourth fastest ageing country in the world, and 15% of the total population will be elderly by 2035.
  • GP in Singapore sentenced to prison for illicit sale of cough syrup
    Making over S$600,000 in profit from the illegal sale of 25,765 bottles of cough preparation to drug abusers, Dr Tan Gek Young was sentenced to a two-year jail term and a S$130,000 fine by the court.
  • Duke-NUS researchers identify gene that could be partly responsible for autism
    A Singaporean team has identified a gene that could play a key role in causing autism. Changes in the gene cause the brain's circuitry and how its cells communicate with each other to work abnormally.
  • Does medical research rely too much on English?
    Many words in science - and especially in medicine - tend to come from Latin and Ancient Greek. Yet, it is English that is the lingua franca in scientific and technical communication, and this has wide-ranging implications.
  • Bleachorexia is a real thing, and needs to be curbed
    Bleachorexia is a form of body dysmorphic disorder. A person with bleachorexia is obsessed with cosmetic dentistry to achieve white teeth beyond their natural colour, and will go to many extremes to achieve this.
  • The Imposter Syndrome: What it is and how it can be treated
    Imposter syndrome refers to persistent feelings of inadequacy in spite of evident success. People with imposter syndrome suffer from chronic self-doubt. They also experience a sense of intellectual fraudulence that takes precedence over any feelings of success or proof of their competence. This syndrome is found in most professions, and healthcare is no exception.